Over the past decade, social media has grabbed the attention of millions, primarily aiming at millennials, and propelling the marketing world into social-based paid-advertising. Paid ads and boosted posts have dominated the way companies are choosing to market, shaping what many see as the new way the world works, but more recently something unique has taken shape for that younger audience. People aren’t checking social media as much.

Now I get it, stats are still showing that the majority of millennials are engrossed in the tiny 6 inch screen and the tiny red dots that let them know someone wants to get ahold of them, but part of marketing in a turbulent market where technology changes every day means that we have to be aware of the small “bleeding edge” group that often paves the way for the greater majority.

We have to be aware of the small “bleeding edge” group that often paves the way for the greater majority.

A recent study of 5,000 students at independent and state schools in England was commissioned by Digital Awareness UK and the Headmasters’ and Headmistresses’ Conference (HMC), which represents the headteachers of independent schools around the world. Of these 5,000 students, 63% said they would not care if social media did not exist and a whopping 71% had taken a break from social media. 

Upon looking deeper, they also found:

  • 60% of friends and companies showed a fake version of themselves
  • 57% said they had received abusive comments online
  • 56% admitted to being on the edge of addiction
  • 52% said social media made them feel less confident about how they look or how interesting their life is

When they were asked to make recommendations on how social media could improve, they urged for less advertising (71%), less fake news (61%), more creative content (55%) and greater privacy (49%).

It’s fair to see why young people would begin to care less about social media, it is a hassle to constantly feel like you are being lied to, sold and advertised to, and to feel like your life is not meeting the standard of fun and excitement that you see in your friends’.

Now, it’s important to know what to do with information like this. Information has shown for a long time that millennials value transparency, authenticity, and working with real people when it comes to purchasing and business. It is incredibly important for you and your company that these traits are expressed in your social and online presence.

It takes writing, posting, and marketing from the perspective of the receiver. 

It takes writing, posting, and marketing from the perspective of the receiver. You have to ask yourself – would I even consider looking at this ad for longer than 3 seconds, would I click this link, would I read this article, would I feel comfortable being offered a donation button at this level of knowing the company, would I feel ready to buy this product yet, etc. Your goal in creating an online experience for this millennial dominated market should be to expose the best parts of your company down to a truly personal level in order to give the reader/viewer the opportunity to relate with what you do.

The fact that millennials, and as the trend grows those in other generations, are spending less time on social media is not a bad thing. It shows that we will simply have a smaller window to impact them with our ads, posts and content, and just means that it’s time to cut the fluff and give people what they really want and need and what they are truly looking for while finding the perfect avenues to provide it to them.

It’s time to cut the fluff and give people what they really want and need.

It sounds simple, right? And yet so many companies haven’t figured it out. We live in a climate where very little information is not available to the public. We are all learners and you have just as much a chance as the rest of the market to get your company out there and impact them with your brand, all you have to do is put in the time.


Resources
https://www.theguardian.com/media/2017/nov/12/millennials-backlash-social-media-facebook-instagram-snapchat
https://www.theguardian.com/media/2017/oct/05/growing-social-media-backlash-among-young-people-survey-shows